SF Squeecast » Blog Archive » Episode 35: Literary Influence Is a Social Disease
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Episode 35: Literary Influence Is a Social Disease


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Welcome to the April/May/June episode of the SF Squeecast! Episode 35 is called “Literary Influence Is a Social Disease” This episode features SF Squeecast regulars Elizabeth Bear, Paul Cornell, Seanan McGuire, Lynne M. Thomas, Catherynne M. Valente, and SPECIAL GUEST Sofia Samatar!

We apologize for taking so long to post a new episode. We had some recording issues with our April episode, our technical producer moved to a new house, and Michael & Lynne have been busy with some life stuff.

In this episode, we generally squeed about The Long Conversation & books we wish we had read when we were younger.  We mentioned so many things that we are skipping the links this month. If you’re having trouble looking up something on your search engine of choice, please let us know.

Click here to listen, press play below, or right-click to download the episode (mp3)

 

Additional credits: Special thanks to our webmaster, Dmitri Zagidulin, our technical producer David McHone-Chase, Jeff Bohnhoff at Mystic Fig Studios for the instrumentals of music by Seanan McGuire, Katy Shuttleworth, who made our ROCKING logo, and Michael Damian Thomas for general administrative support.

6 Responses to “Episode 35: Literary Influence Is a Social Disease”

  1. @verrilicious Says:

    This was a great podcast! I’m glad all the regulars were back for this one, there is definitely a synergy when everyone is part of the discussion. IMHO, it was worth the wait :)

  2. The Last Night of the Fitzroy Tavern Says:

    […] finally, the latest episode of the SF Squeecast is out, with all the regulars together again for the first time in ages, and […]

  3. Fosshage Says:

    New squeecast!! The ‘invisible cups of tea’ transition is a good shift, I think; you all take on tropes so thoughtfully.

    For anybody not inordinately fond of taking their own notes, I think this is a complete list of references, in chronological order. I… needed to organize something today, okay.

    Sofia Samatar, A Stranger in Olondria ( http://www.sofiasamatar.com/Sofia%20writing.html )
    Samuel R. Delaney, Return to Nevèrÿon series ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Return_to_Nev%C3%A8r%C3%BFon_%28series%29 )
    Roger Zelazny, The Chronicles of Amber series ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Chronicles_of_Amber )
    Warren Ellis, Transmetropolitan ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transmetropolitan )
    Charles Stross, Laundry series ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Stross#The_Laundry_Files )
    Rat Queens, comic series ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rat_Queens )
    John Crowley, “Little, Big” ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little,_Big )
    Clive Barker, Weaveworld ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weaveworld )
    Ellen Kushner, The Privilege of the Sword ( https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/821583.The_Privilege_of_the_Sword ), Swordspoint ( https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/68485.Swordspoint )
    Jo Walton, Tooth and Claw ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tooth_and_Claw_%28novel%29 )
    Tamora Pierce ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tamora_Pierce )
    Karen Joy Fowler ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karen_Joy_Fowler )
    Helen Oyeyemi ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helen_Oyeyemi )
    Angélica Gorodischer (translated by Ursula K. Le Guin), Kalpa Imperial ( http://smallbeerpress.com/books/2003/08/15/kalpa-imperial/ )
    Stephen King ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_King ), It (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It_%28novel%29 )
    Sailor Moon Crystal ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sailor_Moon_Crystal#Pretty_Guardian_Sailor_Moon_Crystal ) and rerelease of old seasons ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RWPyM9afQ-w )
    Hugo Awards ( http://www.thehugoawards.org/ )
    Nebula Awards ( http://www.sfwa.org/nebula-awards/ )
    Paul Cornell, The Severed Streets ( http://www.paulcornell.com/books/novels/the-severed-streets/ )
    Katherine Addison, The Goblin Emperor ( http://www.katherineaddison.com/ )
    Captain Marvel, Vol. 1 ( https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/15984353-captain-marvel-vol-1 )
    Gail Simone’s run on Wonder Woman ( http://www.dccomics.com/talent/gail-simone )
    Batwoman ( http://dc.wikia.com/wiki/Batwoman_Vol_1_0, http://dc.wikia.com/wiki/Batwoman_Vol_2 )
    Batgirl ( http://dc.wikia.com/wiki/Batgirl_Vol_1 )
    Ann Leckie, Ancillary Justice ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancillary_Justice )
    NK Jemison ( http://nkjemisin.com/ )
    Nalo Hopkinson ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nalo_Hopkinson )
    Ben H Winters, The Last Policeman, Countdown City ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Last_Policeman )
    Pacific Rim ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_Rim_%28film%29 )

    Mixed feelings – In this episode, mostly ‘if I had read this at a different time in my life, I would have loved it, but I did not love it as much now':
    William Gibson, Neuromancer ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neuromancer )
    Madeleine L’Engle, A Wrinkle in Time ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Wrinkle_in_Time )
    J.R.R. Tolkien ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._R._R._Tolkien )
    Margaret Atwood, MaddAddam ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MaddAddam )
    Anita Blake ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anita_Blake:_Vampire_Hunter )

    Mentioned – Not discussed enough to determine if it was recommended, or only referenced in passing:
    Steven Brust ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steven_Brust )
    Fritz Leiber (?) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fritz_Leiber)
    The Matrix Trilogy (film) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Matrix)
    Emma Bull, War for the Oaks ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_for_the_Oaks )
    Dragonlance ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragonlance )
    Forgotten Realms ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Forgotten_Realms_novels )
    Terry Brooks ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terry_Brooks )
    Neil Gaiman ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neil_Gaiman )
    Joanna Russ ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joanna_Russ )
    Suzy McKee Charnas ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzy_McKee_Charnas )
    Charles De Lint ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_de_Lint )
    Tanya Huff ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tanya_Huff )
    Batman ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Batman )
    Joss Whedon on X-Men ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astonishing_X-Men#Joss_Whedon_run )
    Godzilla ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godzilla )
    Bread and Jam for Frances ( https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/911579.Bread_and_Jam_for_Frances )

  4. Paul (@princejvstin) Says:

    really good conversation. I do like this roundtable format this year.

  5. hobbitqueen Says:

    Speaking of different magic systems, this was the first thing that sprang to mind for me:

    http://pcwrede.com/books/frontier-magic/

    It introduces three separate magic systems developed by different cultural groups. Okay, one of them is European but the main character learns bits and pieces of all three because she has trouble with the European one at school.

    Also features: a protagonist who is basically a support-person for heroes/scientists (pretty much everybody has magic but full-time magicians are basically scientists but they also do traditional fantasy-story-magician things like protect people from magical attacks,etc) and is respected by them for being good at her job. Also, also basilisks, dragons, and other magical wildlife in the wild, wild west. I love these books because the story never quite goes the way you expect it to.

    What really sold me on this world when I picked up the first book, though, was when the characters started discussing alternate cultural approaches to using magic.

    I’m probably not explaining this well, but they’re good books and everyone should read them.

  6. Chadzilla Says:

    This episode jumped to the front of my mind while watching the documentary Jodorowsky’s Dune, detailing the pre-production work on the most influential science fiction film never made. Toward the end there is a montage showing just how much of an influence this unmade film had on the genre films that came after. It’s a perfect example of the “long conversation.”

    I must add a content warning, though.

    Jodorowsky attempts (unwisely and with painful clumsiness) to compare artistic creation with a groom raping his bride on their wedding night. It’s a real WTF moment that soured and destroyed the admiration for the artist that had been growing in me.

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